How to use LIKE and AS – Over 30 REAL examples (+ a Quiz)

LIKE and AS can both be used to say that things are similar.
LIKE is a preposition: similar to somebody/something. LIKE will be used before a noun. “This tastes LIKE chicken.”
AS is a conjunction: in the way in which.
AS will be used before a subject and a verb. “Just leave everything AS it is.”

LIKE vs AS

The word like has many forms. A verb, a noun, an adjective, an adverb, and a preposition. This blog post will look at the preposition form of like and how it is different than the conjunction as

LIKE means similar to. We use it with nouns, pronouns, and gerunds. (A gerund Is a verb followed by -ing that acts as a noun.) 

Your new sound system is amazing. Your basement is like a dance club

The new teacher at my school is a Canadian, like me.

It’s too cold today. When I stepped outside it was like walking into a freezer. 

This pattern is also possible – LIKE [somebody/something] doing something.

Did you hear that? It sounds like a wolf howling. Lock the doors!


We don’t use as the same way. As means in the way which. It is used before a subject and a verb.

I found a briefcase full of money at the side of the road. I didn’t touch it, I left it as it was and called the police. 

I’m planning a retirement party for Lennox this weekend. As you know he will retire at the end of next month. 

In informal English like is frequently used as a conjunction or an adverb instead of as:

Nobody understands him like I do.

I don’t want to upset him again like before.

It is also used instead of as if:

It looks like we’re going to be late.

These uses of like are common but are not considered correct in formal written English.

OxfordLearnersDictionaries.com

LIKE vs AS grammar

LIKEAS
Used before nouns, pronouns, and gerundsUsed before a subject and a verb
“People say that I look like my father.”“The students tidied the room, as the teacher had asked.” 
LIKE can also mean for exampleWe use AS with the adjective usual and the adverb always to show that something happens very often.
AS can also be a preposition that is used to describe a job or function

Your house is gorgeous! It’s like a castle.

Can you hear that? It sounds like a baby crying.

Your English is almost perfect. I wish I could speak like you

I love Italian food like (for example) eggplant parmesan and pasta Bolognese.

It’s already October 3rd and it’s 25 degrees today. It’s like summer.

Let’s go to a casual restaurant tonight.  I don’t want to change clothes, let’s just go as we are.

Let’s meet again tomorrow in the park, as usual.

I used to work as a stuntman before I came to Japan.

We paid to have our kitchen remodeled but I’m not so happy with the new design. I prefer the kitchen as it was before the renovation.

LIKE vs AS examples

LIKE = for example

  • Combat Sports, LIKE boxing and mixed martial arts, are becoming more popular.
  • Fast food restaurants, LIKE McDonald’s and Kentucky Fried Chicken, are trying to offer healthier menu items.

SUCH AS can also be used the same way. 

  • Combat Sports, SUCH AS boxing and mixed martial arts, are becoming more popular.
  • Fast food restaurants, SUCH AS McDonald’s and Kentucky Fried Chicken, are trying to offer healthier menu items.

LIKE and AS can sometimes have the same meaning. LIKE will be used more in informal spoken English.

  • You’re going to change the oil in your car today by yourself. Just do it as I showed you last week and you will be fine.
  • You’re going to change the oil in your car today by yourself. Just do it like I showed you last week and you will be fine.

Do it as I showed you. OK
Do it like I showed you. OK

Do it like this. OK
Do it as this. NG

AS usual/AS always

We use AS with the adjective usual and the adverb always to show that something happens very often. 

  • Matt was late for the meeting as usual.
  • As always Matt was late for the meeting.

AS Is common with phrases like as you know, as we expected, as I thought, as I said… 

  • Jennifer got promoted to the top sales position just as I thought.
  • I’m afraid there’s going to be some layoffs at the company soon. As we all know the economy has been bad this year. 
  • Vincent failed the test, as he expected. He didn’t study. 
  • As the teacher said, not everyone will pass the final exam. 

With the verb said, LIKE is also possible. Like the teacher said, not everyone will pass the final exam.

AS – preposition

As can also be a preposition that Is used to describe a job or function

  • Donna worked as a model in university.

Compare the preposition AS with the preposition LIKE

Nicholas is a teacher. As a teacher, he’s responsible for planning and preparing lessons.
(As a teacher – in his job as a teacher)

Mark is an assistant teacher. Like Nicholas, he’s also responsible for helping to plan the lessons.
(Like Nicholas – similar to Nicholas)

  • In University I worked as a lifeguard at the local swimming pool. 
  • I use the spare room as an office.

Penelope’s resignation came as a surprise to everyone.

Idioms with LIKE and AS

more like… ​used to give a number or an amount that is more accurate than one previously mentioned

  • He wants $1,100 for that car? It’s a piece of junk, the price should be more like $300. 

more like (it) (informal) better; more acceptable

  • Look at that gorgeous star filled night sky. That’s more like it. In the city there’s too much light pollution so there are almost no stars in the night sky. 

as if / as though

​in a way that suggests something

  • Curtis ate my sandwich from the fridge and now he’s acting as if he didn’t do anything.  (His behavior suggests that he didn’t do anything wrong.)
  • It seems as though Curtis has done this before. (His actions suggest that he has done this before.)

As you wish

This expression is used as a way to tell someone they can do or have something they asked for.
A: I really like a roast beef dinner with pumpkin pie for dessert tonight.
B:  As you wish sir.

LIKE vs AS quiz

Answer these 7 LIKE vs AS questions and test your English

You can do the Google Quiz online – HERE

A) The weather forecast is calling for rain all next week. I hate weather like this.
B) The weather forecast is calling for rain all next week. I hate weather as this.

A) My hands are freezing. They feel like blocks of ice.
B) My hands are freezing. They feel as blocks of ice.

A) Walter is a police officer, like are most of his friends.
B) Walter is a police officer, as are most of his friends.

A) Never order tea from this Cafe. It’s like water.
B) Never order tea from this Cafe. It’s as water.

A) The news came like a great shock to everyone.
B) The news came as a great shock to everyone.

A) There’s an extra bedroom in my apartment so I use it like my office. 
B) There’s an extra bedroom in my apartment so I use it as my office. 

A) My car is old and rusty. I wish I had a nice one like you.
B) My car is old and rusty. I wish I had a nice one as you.


You can check your answers HERE.

LIKE vs AS – Printable Quiz PDF worksheet

Download the Quiz as a printable PDF worksheet. Great for teachers to use with private or group classes.

LIKE vs AS Infographic

LIKE vs AS infographic

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