The English preposition AT – 11 example sentences (2018)

    Common uses with the preposition AT In English, we use the adjectives good, bad, better, worse, with the preposition AT, plus a subject. (Math, Science, History, English etc.) “I’m not good at history but I’m good at math.” “Allen is better than me at history but worse at math.” “We are both bad at science, but we are studying hard to get better. (At …

English grammar – comparison (2018)

  English grammar – comparison   The weather is hotter than usual this summer! I thought today would be a good chance to review the comparative form.  This July was hotter than last July! Hotter is the comparative form of the adjective hot. “30℃ degrees is hotter than 15℃ degrees.” Basic comparison grammar Mike is taller than my brother. The …

ME TOO and ME NEITHER (English grammar)

      Do you know when to use me too? How about me neither? One of my private students asked me how to use these two words naturally in English conversation. They weren’t confident on which word to use to agree with a statement, so I created this lesson to help them communicate in English with confidence! Thank you …

SHOULD-Give your opinion or Suggest something

  The word should is commonly used when you want to give your opinion or make a suggestion. We’re saying that something is good or the right thing to do. Giving your opinion “It may rain this afternoon. You should take an umbrella.” = Taking an umbrella is a good idea – because if it rains you will need it “Wow …

How to use Neither and Either (Interactive QUIZ too!)

NEITHER adverb Say that a negative statement is also true for another person/thing “Mike didn’t go to school today and neither did Spencer. determiner/pronoun not one nor the other of two things or people “Neither answer is correct.” (both answers are wrong)  EITHER adverb Comes after negative phrases to say that a feeling or situation is similar to one already talked about “Mike …

English Adverbs used with comparison – much bigger, much more interesting (AUDIO!)

We use adverbs like very/really/quite with adjectives to show a strong degree.It was very cold yesterday.Chris is really angry. What happened?I’m quite tired today. I didn’t sleep well last night.   When we want to show a strong degree with comparisons (bigger, more interesting etc.) we need to use the adverb MUCH   Imported apples are much more expensive than local ones.     Kathy …

English grammar – Countable Nouns As Adjectives (Now with AUDIO!)

Learn how to use Countable Nouns as Adjectives in today’s blog post. I’ll explain this English grammar using natural examples. This post now includes AUDIO for listening practice! Do you know how to read these sentences? “This is a $60 shirt.” / “This shirt is $60.” This is a $60 shirt. = This is a sixty dollar shirt. Easy right? …

"ONLY" ~ adverb (updated for 2018 with AUDIO!)

When we use the word “only” as an adverb it can mean – no more than; no longer than “It was so hot my ice cream melted in only 5 or 10 seconds!” – It took no longer than 5 or 10 seconds “She’s only 21 and she runs her own business.” – She is young (not more than 21) but she has …

English grammar ~ Read and the past participle (Audio for pronunciation practice!)

*In English there is a verb form that we use called the past participle. A common example of this verb form is eaten. Present tense ~ eat  Past tense ~ ate Past participle ~ eaten We often use it with the auxiliary (helper) verb HAS/HAVE  “I like to eat interesting food. I ate alligator in Sao Paulo Brazil, but I have never eaten …